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What’s in a Name?

When gearing up to start Clear Creek Organics, my wife and I spent a great deal of time trying to figure out what to name the farm. We knew the importance of the farm’s name as a first impression to future customers, so we made lists and asked for input from other people. Should we have a name that is playful that reflects our own personalities? Should we simply name the farm after our last name and call it the __ Family Farm. What words did we want to use to convey what we are doing? Farm? Acres? Organic? Family? We hope to work with a few high end restaurants, so should the name be one that would look good on a fancy menu? We went round in circles for what seemed like months trying to come up with the perfect name for the farm.

During one of our “let’s try to come up with the farm name” conversations, Lauren was calling out names, hoping that one would stick. We were walking along a greenbelt trail that journeys along the banks of Clear Creek. At one point she said, “What about Clear Creek?” We live a block from the trail, and we can walk a few miles along it to come within blocks of the farm. Also, the irrigation ditch that will water the fields at the farm is drawn from Clear Creek. I was recognizing more and more how significant this creek is for us. The concept of “place” has become increasingly important to me over the last decade as I’ve been influenced by the writing of Wendell Berry. Berry writes, “Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you.” And a more lengthy quote, but one that gets the the heart of the idea of community being rooted in a particular place:

“Community, then, is an indispensable term in any discussion of the connection between people and land. A healthy community is a form that includes all the local things that are connected by the larger, ultimately mysterious form of the Creation. In speaking of community, then, we are speaking of a complex connection not only among human beings or between humans and their homeland but also between human economy and nature, between forest or prairie and field or orchard, and between troublesome creatures and pleasant ones. All neighbors are included.”

As we walked along the Clear Creek trail, the notion of “place” in my mind, I felt drawn to the idea of a name that centers around the place in which we live.

I was drawn to the name Clear Creek Organics after that. Adding the word “Organics” gave a distinction to what we are doing. My entry into agriculture was through organic production. The first farm I worked for was a certified organic farm. Organic production is what I know and believe in. The basics of organic production are restoring biodiversity, utilizing biological controls for pests and weeds, avoiding GMOs and the use of biosolids, and improving the soil. Some folks don’t like the fact that the USDA controls the use of the word by deciding the rules for who is “certified organic” and who is not. I like the fact that the word Organic has a specific meaning and that it’s a great way for people to recognize our farming practices as it lines up with their beliefs. We are hoping to be certified through the Colorado Department of Agriculture this year.

Our farm’s name holds a lot of significance for me. I hope you find significance in it, too.

Off Season?

With the temps below freezing and snow on the ground it’s easy to assume that the winter season is an “off season” for a farmer, but that’s not quite the case. For most farmers the winter season far from the 2 month hibernation that we wish it could be. The to-do list can often be just as long as it is during the summer season. And for us, starting Clear Creek Organics adds another list of things to accomplish.

It’s true that we don’t have weeding or harvesting that commands our attention. But the winter season is all about planning. And while we aren’t in the field physically, we are there mentally. In a just over a month we will be starting seeds in the greenhouse. By mid March, peas and root crops will go in the ground. June 3 is our first CSA pick up. That might sound like 6 months away to you, but to a farmer it’s right around the corner.

They way I plan out a farm season begins at the end. I start with the crops I hope to have available each week throughout the season. From there I count backwards, based on the vegetable, to determine when that crop needs to go in the ground. If it’s a crop that will be transplanted, like tomatoes, I need to account for the 6-8 weeks it will be in the greenhouse. But some crops, like the tomatoes, need support to grow, so I need to make sure to order tomato stakes and twine to trellis them. All the beds need irrigation, so I better make sure to add that to my shopping list.

I’ve also been working on tearing down a building on the farm to make way for a Home Occupation Kitchen. This will give us a legal space to process food and host farm dinners. Tomorrow I’m going to start putting the greenhouse up so that we can start seeding out transplants in a few weeks. Oh yeah, I need to build a small shed for some dairy goats. And I start teaching the spring semester of Urban Farm Management in two weeks. Yikes!

Off season? Hardly. But all the busyness of the winter months points to the food that my family will be able to provide for yours. And that is a beautiful thing.

This morning I found a great blog post, written by a farmer in the UP of Michigan, that resonated with thoughts I’ve been having about the price disparity between local food systems and institutional food systems. Find the full post here. Head over to the Wintergreen Farm blog and leave a comment for her.

“But for all the excitement about local food and enthusiasm for farming, there is another wave that small farmers cannot help but notice: the wave of consumers gritting their teeth and quietly asking their farmers to bring down the price. We charge two dollars for 12 stems of kale and in our community (an especially low income area) that is considered exorbitantly expensive. What is that about? Why have Americans come to expect high quality food for unreasonably low prices, and what – if anything – can the current crop of small farmers do about it?”

 

Check out the footnote, “Added fats and oils and added sugars are added to foods during processing or preparation.” Reducing processed foods in a person’s diet would drastically impact this portion.

A little deviation from my typical content.

Well worth an hour of your time.

Thoughts?

This morning I was checking my twitter stream and found this tweet: “But You Don’t Look Like a Farmer! http://bit.ly/obay0h #agchat” The tweet was from @agblogfeed and to be clear, agblogfeed is simply an aggregate account to promote all sorts of blog posts relating to agriculture.

The post is about farm wife (her phrase) that is meeting with some other women in or near Chicago to discuss perceptions about agriculture. The “city moms” are taken aback by how the farm wife is dressed, hence the title of the post, “But you don’t look like a farmer.” I think it’s great that this lady had the opportunity to explain more about what her family is doing and what American agriculture means to them, but as I read the post I couldn’t help stumble each time she referred to the other women as “city moms.” I couldn’t help but thing that the same prejudice that the farm wife was having to confront is the same sort of prejudice that allowed her to see the other women as “city moms.”

I used this lady’s blog post as a specific example of what I’ve seen happening a lot within the agriculture/city folk dichotomy. As issues of food security, agriculture sustainability, and the aging farming population continue to rise into mainstream conversations, those of us involved in producing food will continue to share about what we are doing. It is really easy to turn this sort of conversation into an us vs. them position. But if food provider’s continue to refer to other people in stereotypes then why should we expect others to do the same for us?

What do you think? Am I reading too much into this? Do you see examples of this in your relationships?

I’ve always had a pretty high standard for the produce that comes off of our farm. My boss at my previous farm was meticulous in his expectations of the farm’s produce that we delivered to our CSA members. I expected clean and fresh produce when I was working and cooking in restaurant kitchens. So now that I have my own operation, my standard remains pretty high. We triple wash our greens. We soak our roots. We cool everything as soon as possible. I assumed that other farms had the same goals. But this morning as I was scanning my twitter feed I found this post about making a DIY produce wash. I encourage our members to wash their produce before they use it not because I don’t think our produce is clean, but because I think that it’s an important practice to do consistently when preparing produce.

But what caught my attention was AJ’s opening paragrah: “My CSA share is getting bigger and bigger by the week, which means lots and lots of produce washing. It’s funny, you’d think that straight from the farm would mean less cleaning, since everything’s local, organic, blah blah blah. But that’s really not the case. I find more dirt and critters in my CSA fruits and vegetables than I’ve ever seen in any produce at the grocery store. You don’t even want to know what I found in one of my peaches this past week… seriously.”

So I’m left wondering, do people associate “straight-from-the-farm produce to be covered in dirt and insects?” What do you think?

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